Three Keys to Quality Bone Density Reporting

This posting is the last of a 3-part series about bone density reporting and how BoneStation can make a difference compared to common practices. Part 1 focused on costs reduction and part 2 on time savings.  In this article we discuss three specific areas that BoneStation addresses in regards to quality:

  • The Report – components that comprise a good bone density report
  • Review process – facilitating a sound interpretation
  • Workflow – improving communications between staff

The Report
The International Society for Clinical Densitometry defines the minimum requirements for a bone density report.  Some items that should appear on a report include: patient demographics, BMD values for each site measured, DXA manufacturer/model, and significant change.

BoneStation automates report creation.  Manual data entry is eliminated.  BoneStation extracts all appropriate DXA data and places the data in a report.  In addition, changes in BMD and determination of significant change are automated.  A final bone density assessment is even suggested.

The Review Process
While DXA bone density scan images should not be used for diagnostic purposes, they are instrumental in determining the consistency of serial measurements.  Is the patient positioned properly?  Are the regions of interest (ROIs) consistent with prior scans?  What is the technical quality of the scans?

BoneStation’s review process is designed to highlight key aspects for interpretation.  Prior scans are easily visible. ROIs may be viewed both visually and numerically.  Technical quality of scans must be specified and may also appear on the report.

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Workflow
In most situations, the technologist and reading physicians are in different locations.  Scans are not typically read in real time either.  Improved communications among bone density staff can lead to increased quality.

  • BoneStation allows technologists to pass information to reading physicians via “scan comments”, which are entered on the DXA and appear in BoneStation.
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  • BoneStation may be configured to “validate” patient information for consistency.  Is data missing, is patient demographic info consistent, etc.  For example, if a female patient is 62 years old and is designated as pre-menopausal, BoneStation is able to provide a warning that this information may not be valid.
  • When a reanalysis is required, BoneStation facilitates communications between the reading physician and technologist.  The reason for reanalysis is described to the technologist.  The scan is also tracked as awaiting reanalysis – so staff will not lose track of it.
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Summary
BoneStation is designed specifically for DXA based bone densitometry.  It increases efficiency and quality simultaneously.  Much of the mundane handling of bone density scans is automated. It facilitates a review process designed for bone density, and enables easy communication among bone density staff.

BoneStation has produced more than a half million reports and has proven to be reliable solution for BMD reporting.  Customers such as Mass General Hospital, Swedish Medical Group, Emory and others enjoy higher throughput and quality at lower cost.

Speedy Bone Density Reporting with BoneStation

This posting is part 2 of a 3-part series highlighting how BoneStation can reduce costs, save time, and improve quality in BMD reporting.  In the previous blog, we emphasized the cost savings aspect. Here we focus on the time aspect, or the speed of reporting.

Bone Densitometry using DXA has been around for a while. As we all know, a particularity of BMD scans is that they output images (spine, hip, etc) as well as numerical values (BMD, BMC, T-score, Z-score, etc…).

In today’s digital world, still many practices waste precious time in error-prone manual steps when reviewing DXA studies. These steps include: writing down numbers on paper, calculating BMD changes with calculator, retrieving historical scans from PACS, using post-its to ask technologists for reanalysis of a scan, using dictation, using the FRAX website, etc…

BoneStation resolves these issues, thereby offering the opportunity to save time at several points of the workflow:

  • Data (BMD, T-score, etc..) is extracted directly and instantaneously from the DXA scans
  • No need for human reading, dictation or transcription
  • Current and prior scans (images and numbers) show up side by side allowing for instantaneous comparisons
    • no need to pull charts, or to retrieve historical images and data on PACS
  • BMD changes are computed instantaneously and show up in the report
  • BMD changes are instantaneously compared to the stored least significant changes
  • FRAX is calculated automatically according to ISCD recommendations
  • Request for reanalysis is built in BoneStation for quick and traceable communication with the technologist

Even today we occasionally observe situations where readers do not compare scans with priors and do not calculate changes in BMD.  The International Society of Clinical Densitometry (ISCD) recommends these as important elements of a bone density report.  Perhaps it takes too long to provide this information in a report.  However, BoneStation makes it easy.

This BoneStation video illustrates how quickly a reading physician can review a spine and hip DXA study, including FRAX.  An actual review, with prior scans, can often take under one minute with BoneStation.  With the narrative in the accompanying video, it takes about a minute and half to review a spine/hip.

We hope that this brief blog helps you think through your bone densitometry process. 

Sylvie Bokshorn

BoneStation has produced more than a quarter million reports and has proven to be reliable solution for BMD reporting.  Customers such as MGH, Swedish Medical Group, Emory and others enjoy higher throughput and quality at lower cost.

Bone Density Report Distribution: the last mile

The physician has interpreted the bone mineral density (BMD) test and generated the report.  Now what?

Obviously it needs to be sent or “distributed” to the interested parties.  In this article we look at this distribution phase, which is sort of the “last mile” in the reporting process.

So what happens to the BMD report once it has been created? Having worked with a variety of hospitals, we know that… it depends! There is no standard answer to that question because it depends on several key factors including:

  • Who will be the final “consumers” of the report?
  • Does the facility have an Electronic Medical Records system (EMR)?  Who has access to the EMR?

Let’s dive a little more into these questions.

The final consumer of the report is typically the ordering physician i.e. the physician who prescribed a bone mineral density test for his/her patient. Usually it is the primary care physician, although other doctors treating the patient may also need to see the report.

Today, most healthcare providers have a functional EMR in place.  It is generally accessible to all physicians, and usually the appropriate place to store bone density reports. (There may be a radiology information system (RIS) and/or a PACS in place too;  often though these systems are available only to radiologists.)

The EMR, however, may not be available to all physicians who need to access test results.  If the ordering doctor is located in the hospital where the BMD test occurs, he/she is then connected to the EMR. But the ordering doctor could be external to that hospital or even located in a remote office with limited access to the EMR.

What is then the best way to distribute exam results, such as bone density reports?

BoneStation offers the flexibility required to handle most situations as explained below. There are three methods available to distribute reports:

  1. Printing – which typically means the report is sent via mail to the consumer
  2. Faxing
  3. Transmission to an EMR –  through a digital interface (typically an HL7 interface)

In addition, BoneStation allows the distribution method to vary for each primary care physician (ie. the consumer).  A couple examples:

  • A physician with access to the EMR may simply receive reports via the EMR
  • A physician with access to the EMR may receive reports via the EMR, fax, and a printed report via mail
  • Physicians with access to the EMR may receive reports via EMR and physicians without access to the EMR may receive faxes

As mentioned above, other doctors than the ordering physician may need to receive the patient’s report.  This is very easy to set up with BoneStation thanks to its distribution list functionality.

For the sake of traceability, the complete history of each report, recipient, distribution method, and distribution date/time is stored in BoneStation. The hospital staff can quickly and easily review that historical data.

BoneStation offers the necessary flexibility for distributing BMD reports.  It support traditional methods, such as print/mail and fax, which are still needed today, in addition to the modern solution of interfacing to Electronic Medical Records systems.

In today’s fragmented healthcare landscape it is important for vendors to offer flexible solutions to accommodate different situations, not only within the medical office or hospital, but also at the interfaces between stakeholders. We have learnt that even in the very specific case of the distribution of BMD reports, there can be many scenarios that need to be resolved, and we will continue to address the constantly evolving landscape.

BoneStation and Epic: The first interface

BoneStation’s first Epic integration occurred recently at a major Massachusetts medical center.  This center has six DXA bone density screening locations which report BMD studies. Bone density tests are read via BoneStation, a browser based application with centralized database, and reports are made available to clinicians via Epic.

The main goals of the integration were to:

  • Increase turn-around time of reports for the clinicians
  • Provide fully formatted reports with tables, images, and graphs
  • Have clinicians notified automatically when reports become available

Before integration, the reports, after being reviewed in BoneStation, needed to be printed and scanned into Epic.  This process greatly delayed the availability of bone density reports.

After integration, bone density reports are available in Epic within seconds of being read.

BoneStation provides richly formatted reports with tables, images, and graphs.  It was desirable to have these available to referring physicians.  The BoneStation Portal, which works in conjunction with the HL7 interface, provides fully formatted reports in Epic.epic with bd report - annotated - blog

Clinicians are also notified when a bone density result arrives for one of their patients.  The HL7 interface triggers this mechanism when a bone density report is finalized in BoneStation and transmitted to Epic.  Clinicians are then notified via their “In Basket”.epic inbox - annotated - blog

 

 

 

 

 

The first BoneStation interface to Epic was successful in accomplishing the medical center’s three major objectives, thereby increasing both the effectiveness and efficiency of their bone density testing practices.

Workflow for Bone Density Practices

This posting is the second in a series that discusses cloud based computing and benefits to bone density providers.  For a brief description of The Cloud and cloud based computing, see our earlier posting.

In this article we’ll focus on workflow.  A typical bone density department has several participants involved in processing bone density scans.

  • Technologist – interacts with patient and performs scan and analysis
  • Reviewing Physician – interprets scans and creates report
  • Scheduler – in a multi-DXA center, may need to schedule patient on same DXA as prior exam
  • Office Staff – distributes and/or prints reports

A cloud-based system can make an entire team function more efficiently and smoothly.  Each participant interacts at a different phase in the scanning and reporting process and can be prompted to perform their part of the work at the appropriate time.

Here is a screenshot of the workflow process in BoneStation.  The first column is the patient; second column shows the scans, and the third column is the exam status.  Of course, the tasks can be sorted and filtered by the status.

This screen shot demonstrates work to be done and where each exam is in the process.  Each participant can then focus on their tasks in moving the exam through the process.

  • A technologist will be interested in Exam Pending, which means that BoneStation is awaiting for a scan(s) – in this case a hip scan.  When the hip scan arrives the exam goes to Exam Ready.
  • Exam Ready indicates the exam is ready to be reviewed.
  • Being Reanalyzed means the reviewing physician has requested a reanalysis.
  • Reviewed means a report has been created and it needs to be distributed and/or printed.

Cloud based software lends itself to making teams more productive.    Multiple users have access to the same information and processes.  This is difficult to achieve with desktop software, which typically isolates users from each other.